“The Flute player of Brindaban”

“The Flute player of Brindaban”

the flute player of brindaban

Introduction of the Poem

“The Flute player of Brindaban” is one of the most anthologized poems of Sarojini Naidu. This poem forms part of The Broken Wing, The poem concerns Lord Krishna, who lured the people of Brindaban by the Magic of his flute. That is why lord Krishna is also called the flute-player of Brindaban. The poem is sung by a Meera like devotee of Lord Krishna Who has surrendered everything to the Lord. Sarojini herself gives this note to the poem: “Krishna the Divine flute player of Brindaban. Who plays the Tune of the Infinite that lures every Hindu heart away from mortal cares and Attachments”.

Summary of the Poem

The poet asks Lord Krishna as to why did he begin to play the matchless tune of his flute which has wound her dreaming hart to it. She has been so much lured by the magic of the flute’s music that she has to come to him for saking everything the earthly loves and the worldly Attractions included. She says that she would follow Lord Krishna whether he goes to the land of Indra or he moves to Yama’s court. She says that high mountains and deep seas have no meaning to her. To hear to the music of the flute she would be ready to go the untravelled places as well.

Explanation & Analysis

  1. Why didst thou play……….flute-player with thee?

Reference– These lines have been taken from Sarojini Naidu’s immortal Poem “The Flute Player of Brindaban”. In this poem Sarojini tells us about the enchanting music which lord Krishna plays and by which he is able to Win the heart of every listener.

Context– This poem concerns Lord Krishna who is termed by Sarojini Naidu as the/Divine Flute Player. The song of Lord Krishna is able to win the hearts of all people in the world because his melody is infinite. The poem is spoken by a Meera like devotee of Lord Krishna.

Explanation- The poet Sarojini begins by complaining to Lord Krishna as to why did he start music of his wonderful flute, standing under the shade of his favourite Kadamba tree. The music entwined the idly dreaming heart of Sarojini to itself by its wonderful tune. The poet says that the song of Lord Krishna is so charming that she cannot leave the sons. Hence wherever Lord Krishna would go she would follow him. This following is impulsive.

  1. To Indra’s golden ……….Beloved I must go!

Reference– These lines form part of the exquisite, lyric penned by Sarojini Naidu, whom Mahatma Gandhi hailed as the Nightingale of India. The Lyric is titled ‘The Flute Player of Brindaban’ and is part of Sarojini’s collection of poems entitled ‘The Broken Wing.

Context– In this poem Sarojini sings of the exquisite music which Lord Krishna sings. This allurement is so great that the poet is forced to follow Lord Krishna wherever he goes.

Explanation– In this penultimate stanza of the poem Sarojini Naidu Speaks of the divine music which flows from the flute of Lord Krishna. She says that sometime Lord Krishna moves to the flowering garden of Lord. Indra, who is the rain god of the Hindu pantheon, in the land of Lord Indra there are ever flowing rivers and everlasting groves full of many types of flowers. If Lord Krishna goes to the land of Indra, Sarojini says that she would follow him there. On the other hand, if Lord Krishna happens to move the realm of Lord Yama, the Lord of Death, she would follow him there also, such is the lure of the flute of this Flute Player of Brindaban.

  1. No peril of the deep………The nectar of the flute.

Reference- These lines form the concluding stanza of the poem “The Flute Player of Brindaban” written by Sarojini Naidu. She is popularly known as the ‘Nightingale of India’.

Context– In this poem Sarojini Naidu speaks about the divine music which comes out of the flute of Lord Krishna. Like the Gopikas ancient times the poetess is also charmed by Lord Krishna’s flute which he used to play standing under the shades of his favourite Kadamba tree.

Explanation– In these last six lines of her immortal lyric Sarojini Naidu expresses her desire to follow Lord Krishna to the farthest most place known on the earth. She says that movement on the sea and mountains is rather difficult. But she would gladly accept to follow Lord Krishna whether he moves on the breast of the sea or on the heights of the mountains. Even when Lord Krishna goes to a place where no man has ever gone, or even where light has not traveled. None of these things can check the poet from going there if Lord Krishna goes there. Thus Sarojini proudly declares that she would follow Lord Krishna to any every place where he goes.

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